Light Through Lettuce

Light Through Lettuce

I dropped off a food shelf donation last week, on Tuesday morning. Lettuce, kale and cucumbers are starting to show signs of being abundant, so it felt like time to share. I rolled into the Family Pathways dusty parking lot, left the jeep unlocked, walked into the pole building- turned- donation center and handed the first load of fresh, organic produce (of hopefully many more) to the volunteer who was working. Onto the scale it went and came in at a whopping two pounds. Lettuce doesn’t weigh much. And greens and cukes don’t provide much bulk for someone who is trying to make each calorie count. Earlier in the morning, I had hesitated to even bother donating something that seemed so insignificant. But the hope that lettuce that has enjoyed a cool, wet spring in our garden will find its way into a meal for someone who might not otherwise have gotten something fresh and healthy won out.

The volunteer wrote up a receipt, said a heartfelt thank you, and I promised to bring more when it becomes available. The entire exchange took approximately six minutes. I got back in the jeep, rolled down the window to let in the morning air and was on my way to the next thing.

So, even though those six minutes seemed like just a blip on the screen of a day, I can remember that even though some lettuce and cucumbers and kale might not fill a hungry belly that wants more protein, the love and commitment to a healthy community and earth might somehow fill in some of the gaps.  Sometimes it seems like there are always more gaps to fill.  But perhaps I need to remember that though they lack caloric bulk, the energy that those vegetables carry with them has the potential to shine a small bit of light, wherever they end up.

On the days when it seems like it’s just not enough, I need to remember that no act of giving is insignificant. Every gift has value, and every act of kindness has the ability to shine light where it is needed. Even lettuce.

 

This post originated at Red Brush Farms.

  • Amelia McGinley

    Food shelves are full of packaged items. I bet it was really refreshing for someone to have access to something fresh and homegrown!